Lipoprotein

Medical Specialties: Cardiology, Family practice, Internal medicine


Clinical Definition

A lipoprotein is a particle composed of lipid and protein molecules, bound together, that transports cholesterol in the blood. Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) make up the majority of the cholesterol in the body; high levels increase the risk of coronary artery disease and stroke. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) absorb cholesterol and transport it to the liver, which then eliminates it from the body; high HDL levels reduce the risk of coronary artery disease and stroke.


In Our Own Words

A lipoprotein is a particle that is part protein and part lipid (a fat-like substance). Lipoproteins carry cholesterol in the blood.

LDL delivers cholesterol to build up in the arteries. LDL is considered the bad form of cholesterol because high levels raise the risk of heart disease and stroke.

HDL or good cholesterol absorbs the cholesterol from the body and takes it back to the liver, which then flushes it out of the body. The higher the HDL levels, the lower the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Relevant Conditions
  • Cholesterol
  • Coronary artery disease (heart disease)
Common Types
  • HDL
  • LDL
Share this article
sources
Keep Reading

NEED ANSWERS?
Investigate your bodys signs and signals.
Try Symptom Checker