Pregnancy Prevention

Published: February 6, 2012

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Overview

When it comes to avoiding pregnancy, the only 100%, sure-fire method of birth control is abstinence. However, other methods of birth control can help you avoid becoming pregnant and drop your chances of pregnancy to almost 0%. For the utmost prevention of pregnancy, you should combine two methods of birth control, such as both the condom and the pill.

An important thing to remember is that there are dozens of fly-by-night products and methods out there that claim to help you avoid pregnancy. Many people believe, for instance, that one way to avoid getting pregnant is stopping before ejaculation and "pulling out." If this does work a few times, it probably won't work for long. "Pulling out" is not a method of birth control, it's just rolling the die and hoping it lands a certain way. Even before ejaculation, fluids from the penis carry sperm and can get you pregnant.

Some manufacturers claim that if you take certain herbs, you'll avoid pregnancy. More often than not, such advertisers are not as interested in your health as they are in your pocketbook. Don't waste your money on supplements or herbs that claim to work. Instead, take real precautions. See your doctor so you can get a prescription for birth control pills. Pregnancy has been avoided by millions of women successfully just by properly taking a birth control pill. Pregnancy isn't something to take lightly, so it's worth going to the doctor even if you're embarrassed.

Remember that even if you're on the pill, there's only one way to protect yourself against sexually transmitted diseases while ensuring that you don't get pregnant: a condom. Chances are, pregnant women who claim to have used pills or condoms still got pregnant either didn't take the pills properly or didn't understand the right way to use the condom. Pregnancy isn't that difficult to prevent if you make an effort.

It's your body, you have control. Pregnant women say there's nothing as wonderful as carrying a child, but if you're not ready, it can be devastating, especially with teenage pregnancy. There are so many activities that other teenagers get to do during those years that pregnant teens will be missing. Birth control is usually available for free through your health department or family planning clinic. Since it's unlikely anything will prevent teenage students from having sex, making sure they understand the birth control available is crucial.

If you've had unprotected sex and you experience the first signs of pregnancy, it's too late. You're probably aware of the first tell-tale sign that you're pregnant: a missed period. If you miss a period, take a pregnancy test on your own or through your doctor. If you are pregnant, start taking prenatal vitamins and eating right. If you're not, practice birth control from now on so that you won't become pregnant before you're ready.

Resources

For more information about preventing pregnancy, refer to the following websites:

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